UK’s youngest head teacher ‘should be banned from teaching for life’

Grow up your education, grow up.

As the UK government considers whether to outlaw nursery schools, its oldest and most senior head teacher has told parents they can’t keep their children from going to the state school. 

Theresa May’s move will also see the move to ban nursery schools for four years, but a spokeswoman said that could be changed once the legislation is agreed. 

Growth of the UK National Academy of Teachers said in a statement that its members had grown up with an environment in which it was important that children learned how to work together and that this would continue to be the case.

“We are working to ensure that our nursery schools are not just the ‘first step’ to our educational goals, but that they also offer the opportunity for children to develop the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the workplace,” the academy said. “

We believe that, by promoting growth and development, nursery education will allow all children to learn to be more effective workers, which will ultimately help ensure that we achieve our economic and social goals.” 

“We are working to ensure that our nursery schools are not just the ‘first step’ to our educational goals, but that they also offer the opportunity for children to develop the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the workplace,” the academy said. 

“Nursery schools are key to the success of our young people, supporting the creation of future generations of professionals and contributing to our economy.” 

The national academy said there was evidence to show that the “growth of children in nursery is a key driver of economic growth” and that its research has suggested that nursery education was the best way to help young people to achieve a better life. 

But the National Association of Head Teachers (NASH) called for a moratorium on the introduction, saying it was too early to say whether or not the ban would be effective. 

NASH’s National Executive Secretary Mark Williams said: “There is clear evidence that growth in nursery school attendance has a positive effect on children’s academic performance. 

A recent study found that the proportion of pupils who were attending nursery school increased by 1.6 per cent from 2010 to 2020. 

This is because children who attend nursery are more likely to be in a better position to gain their own skills and to build the skills they need to succeed. 

It is also important that nursery school is not only the first step to bettering the lives of children, but is also a key part of the curriculum.” 

Mr Williams said he hoped that the government would take a balanced approach and that the ban was a “positive step” for young people. 

He added: “Nurseries can play a significant role in our children’s education and we will continue to work with NASH and other organisations to support them to make the right decision for their children.” 

In a separate development, the head of the Department for Education’s Department for Children and Families said the introduction would help the economy. 

Diane Abbott said the change would help to make sure children who were going to be attending nursery were ready to enter into work and were not in the care of a carer or foster family.

She said the ban on nursery schools would “help to provide a more equal opportunity for all children and would also help to create a more resilient economy”. 

“If the government takes a strong stance on this, it will create opportunities for young workers to make a career, for parents to make an extra income and for employers to recruit and retain the very best talent,” Ms Abbott said.

Mr Williams added that the move would help ensure all children were able to grow up with a strong foundation in life skills and that they were ready for work. 

What you need to know about:The debate on nursery school bans The debate is about what the future holds for our childrens education, and how we are going to tackle the problem of inequality.

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